Women and Local Government

Women and Local Government

Category : General News

Is it important to have women involved in Local Government?

From my first two weekly press releases, you are now aware that I am local born and bred; I am a woman; I am a wife; I am a Mother; I am a Grandmother; and I have thirty years plus Local Government experience and knowledge. There is a great deal of information about 50:50 vision for A National Program for Gender Equity for Local Government, implemented in 2009 and just after Queensland Council amalgamations. The report marks a new phase in implementing the National Framework for Women in Local Government. It launches a range of initiatives under the banner 50:50 Vision. The Australian Local Government Women’s Association (ALGWA) sees the strategy to be a decade-long program to advance gender equity in local government.

National Statement of Commitment

We will work towards increasing the representation of women in local government, both as elected members and as senior managers and professionals. We will undertake ongoing reviews of policies and practices to remove barriers to women’s participation and to engender safe, supportive working and decision-making environments that encourage and value a wide range of views.

Goal

To increase the participation of women in Australian local government so that Councils more accurately reflect their communities. This will be evidenced by continuing growth in numbers of women councillors, mayors, chief executives and senior staff in all States and the Northern Territory and in all types of Councils.

Objectives

  • To create Councils and communities where all participate and actively share their skills, knowledge and experience.
  • To engender inclusive Councils where a full range of opinions is sought, respected and taken into account in decision-making
  • To ensure effective leadership in implementing the strategies set out in this Framework
  • To expand training and networking opportunities that will support

The Local Government Association of Queensland states that of the 512 councillors in Queensland, just 150 (29 per cent) are women and only 11 per cent of council CEOs are represented by females. The statistics do not sit well with many females involved already with local government, as there are countless women in the state who merit senior civic roles.

RADF

I believe and support most importantly that candidates are not elected on gender basis only, but also on individual merit.

 

The 2012 Regional Arts Development Fund (RADF) Committee consisted of all women, and was a very productive group.  I was employed at the RADF Liaison Officer by Somerset Regional Council.


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179 YEARS AT CRESSBROOK

Today, the McConnel family celebrate 179-years of settlement and custodianship at Cressbrook.

Cressbrook is now run by fifth-generation descendant Christopher McConnel, with his wife Susan and their daughter Caitlin. Their home, the House at Cressbrook, is the oldest residence and third oldest building in Queensland, and they are the oldest identified family business in Queensland.

In the words of Madge McConnel (nee Kent of Jondaryan), wife of second-generation owner of Cressbrook, James Henry McConnel, “the story of Cressbrook would not be complete without reference to old friends, and employees whose memory we value, and whose descendants some of them are still with us or settled near us.”

Madge’s words continue to have relevance today, over 100-years on. Today, Christopher, Susan and Caitlin not only celebrate this historic milestone, but more importantly, it provides an opportunity for them to be grateful for, and to acknowledge the continued support of friends, family and members of the public who hold their story, and the history of agriculture and development in Australia, dear to their hearts.
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