Councillor Report – Council Ordinary Meeting – Wednesday 13 May 2020

Councillor Report – Council Ordinary Meeting – Wednesday 13 May 2020

Category : General News

Cr Cheryl Gaedtke – Ordinary Meeting 13 May 2020

Agenda Item # 5 Matters of Public Interest
It is with sadness that I reflect on the following events since our last Ordinary Council Meeting:
• The passing of a long-term Toogoolawah identity and true gentleman, Mr John Douglas Seymour. John joined his Father, Wilfred Seymour who founded Seymour’s Transport in 1924. The business was awarded an International Harvester agency in 1929, and which continued for over 55 years, it also took on a Toyota dealership in 1970. John 95, was a very pivotal part of the business and continued to play an active role until only a number of years ago.
• The passing of long-term Kilcoy Shire Council employee, Mr Eric Thomas Gray. Eric 91, worked at Kilcoy Shire Council from 1956 to 1991, and during the latter part of this time was my immediate supervisor. Eric held the position of Cost Clerk and Acting Shire Clerk and I respected Eric as my mentor and valued the work ethic that he instilled in me. Prior to 1985 and computerisation council utilised the Kalamazoo loose leaf ledger system, and I can recall being taught by Eric that all columns must balance preciously by the use of manual calculators, not even a one cent discrepancy was tolerated.
• The horrific accident that occurred in Victoria on 22 April 2020 which resulted in the biggest single loss of life of Victorian Police claiming the lives of four Police Officers. As we are in roles that relate directly to service to our communities, loss of life is the ultimate price to pay, and one not expected. They have now joined the legacy of our Australian’s heroes.

Agenda Item # 42 Councillors’ Report
Anzac Day Commemoration 2020 was remembered by many in our communities, and in a very different way to how we normally do this. Very proud and grateful communities gathered at the front of their properties with flags, candles, recordings and live connection to Anzac Day Commemoration broadcasts. Well done to those who took the time and effort to commemorate this special day. Given the positive feedback, this type of commemoration may well become a future trend.

I have received numerous complaints about the unacceptable behaviour of some motorists in specific areas of our region. It appears that more roads have become popular meeting spots for burnouts, the practice of keeping a vehicle stationary and spinning its wheels. Burnouts has the potential to become a serious form of competition and entertainment, and the practice is illegal when carried out on public property. I acknowledge the difficulty in policing this matter, however a holistic approach may be required to deal with the current and future unsafe public road use.

The provision of online technology has kept us in touch were possible during the COVID period. Zoom held meetings has provided the platform to conduct various meetings, and I am aware that one local community group held their monthly meeting via messenger. Webinars are another successful online platform that offers interaction at different levels. I have taken part in two episodes of the Rural Aid Community Builders Series webinars that focus on community rebuilding and resilience and will cover a range of topics designed to inspire towns and prepare them for post COVID-19. Ideas will be shared, help with tourism initiatives, discuss long-term viability, what grants are available and how to access them, and more. The first two topics were focused on What Makes a Great Town? and Building Good Businesses in Small Towns. Peter Kenyon is the facilitator and possesses great experience and knowledge. Many years ago, Peter Kenyon facilitated a public town meeting in Kilcoy which resulted in community invigoration and the experience certainly provided the locals with an “up an at ‘em” attitude. I can report that Peter definitely implanted community with a caring, positive and fresh perspective about our town, and given the current challenges, these attributes are needed region wide.


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179 YEARS AT CRESSBROOK

Today, the McConnel family celebrate 179-years of settlement and custodianship at Cressbrook.

Cressbrook is now run by fifth-generation descendant Christopher McConnel, with his wife Susan and their daughter Caitlin. Their home, the House at Cressbrook, is the oldest residence and third oldest building in Queensland, and they are the oldest identified family business in Queensland.

In the words of Madge McConnel (nee Kent of Jondaryan), wife of second-generation owner of Cressbrook, James Henry McConnel, “the story of Cressbrook would not be complete without reference to old friends, and employees whose memory we value, and whose descendants some of them are still with us or settled near us.”

Madge’s words continue to have relevance today, over 100-years on. Today, Christopher, Susan and Caitlin not only celebrate this historic milestone, but more importantly, it provides an opportunity for them to be grateful for, and to acknowledge the continued support of friends, family and members of the public who hold their story, and the history of agriculture and development in Australia, dear to their hearts.
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